Sunday, May 18

Libertarian Pragmatism

[Libertarian Pragmatism]

It's difficult being an anti-authoritarian libertarian pragmatist.
[More about what I mean by that some other time. For now, I’ll just say that I would approve and endorse controls over my or anyone else’s freedoms 1) when those controls are absolutely necessary, 2) when those controls are not redundant, or when the issues are not already enforcable with other controls that I may or may not already approve of, 3) when the effects of those controls would produce a tangible improvement, 4) when likely betterment outweights possible harm to other parties in the enforcement of said controls, 5) again . . . . some other time.]

Anyway, most of the libertarian types I know skew Republican.
[And, I cannot understand why --- the Republicans are behaving like fascists. Whatever happened to the Republican Personal Freedom and Autonomy stance? Did I just imagine it?]

Many of the anti-authoritarian types I know skew Socialist.
[Socialism is an idyllic concept outside my epistemological construct --- I am unable to believe it could work and find most definitions of socialism to have a contradictory stance on control in general.]

I have few peers. Alas, I shall persevere.

Anyway, I found an amusing anecdote on the Insurgency Chicago website. And, yeah, I realize it’s out-of-date, but it made me smirk, so here it is:
President Bush went to an elementary school to speak to a class of students. The President told them they could ask questions, but first had to raise their hands, stand and identify themselves with their first names.

The first student raised his hand and the President recognized him. The boy said: "My name is Michael and I have three questions. One, do you think this war is a Just war? Two, don't you think the American attack on Hiroshima was a Terrorist Attack? And three, How did you become President when you clearly did not have the majority of the vote?"

Just then, the recess bell rang and all the children went out to play. After Fifteen minutes the children returned to the classroom and resumed their time with the President.

The next student raised his hand and stood and identified himself. "My name is Walter and I have five questions. One, do you think this war is a Just war? Two, don't you think the American attack on Hiroshima was a Terrorist Attack? Three, how did you become President when you clearly did not have the majority of the vote? Four, why did the Recess Bell ring twenty minutes early? and Five, where is Michael?"
Indeed, where is Michael, and where are all of his peers? One certainly would have difficulty finding them in mass media. One would have to troll and dig more consistently and diligently than I am able to find the balanced reporting we've been erroneously led to expect from the media at large.